Yay for Fall! Apple Pie

 

For the almost 25 years that I’ve used the Ankarsrum, I’ve always told people that pie dough was the one thing this amazing machine couldn’t do. Pie dough is made by combining flour and salt, and then adding chunks of cold butter which then get “cut” into the flour (much like making biscuits) to create this crumbly (small pieces of butter wrapped in flour) texture, add a little ice water and…Boom! It all comes together to form pie dough.

As we’ve gone over many times before, you CAN NOT put cold butter in the Double Whisk Bowl or you will end up with broken gears and bent wires. In case you missed that, click HERE for a quick refresher on how to properly use the beater bowl and whisks.

I’ll be honest, it has always bothered me that I couldn’t make pie dough with my Ankarsrum. I mean come on, it can do just about everything else. Except sadly, a load of laundry! So I set out to figure out a way to make it work even using cold butter.

I’m not sure where I saw it or if I read it somewhere, but a great tip for cutting cold butter into flour for biscuits, scones or even pie dough, is to actually grate the butter on a box grater to create perfect little butter shavings. The reason this is ideal for pie, is because you want each small piece of butter totally wrapped in flour. Once you add the liquid, the dough comes together and all those perfectly coated butter pieces create a buttery, crispy, flaky crust. I figured, why couldn’t I do that using the Vegetable Cutter Attachment for my Ankarsrum fitted with the grating drum.

I went ahead and cut the butter into 2 Tbsp chunks and placed them in the freezer for about 30 minutes to ensure that the butter would stay nice and cold. After grating, I recommend putting the butter back in the freezer while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

L: 2 Tbsp chunks of frozen butter - M: Running the butter through the grater - R: Perfect shavings of butter
L: 2 Tbsp chunks of frozen butter – M: Running the butter through the grater – R: Perfect shavings of butter

The other tip for a super flaky crust, is the liquid you use in your recipe. The protein in flour is the gluten. When you add water to flour, there is a chemical reaction that takes place and the gluten will begin to develop just by the water touching it. This is how “no knead” bread recipes work. Let the water and flour sit long enough, and the gluten will develop enough for the bread to rise. The development of the gluten also gives you that bread texture that you do not want with a pie crust. I knew all this about bread dough but then a friend of mine suggested using cold vodka in place of the ice water in my pie crust recipe. He said the vodka doesn’t react with the gluten like water does and the alcohol cooks out completely while baking leaving you with a buttery, flaky crust. Be sure to keep the vodka in the freezer right up until you use it. It is very important to keep everything cold. If you are completely opposed to using alcohol then be sure to use ice cold water.

Crust
Crust steps: Dry ingredients plus cold butter shavings – butter pieces totally coated in flour – add alcohol (or ice water) – mix until large clumps form.

crust-collage-2

Once the dough is formed, roll it out right away. If you let the dough get too warm, the butter will begin to soften and it will be more difficult to roll out. This recipe makes enough crust for a top and bottom crust for a 9″ pie dish. I like to use at least 12 oz of dough for the bottom because you need the dough to cover the bottom and up the sides of the pie dish. 7-8 oz of crust will be used for the top.

I love my French style rolling pin. The tapered ends allow for easy rolling. Be sure to use plenty of flour on your mat and rotate your crust a quarter turn after every few passes of the rolling pin. Once you’ve got the crust rolled out to the desired size, fold the crust in half from left to right, then again from the top to the bottom. You now have a wedge shaped crust that is easy to transfer into your pie dish. Just center up the point of the wedge and unfold to cover your dish.

crust-collage-3

Fill your crust with your pie filling. Now you’re ready to roll out the crust for the top. Use the same technique as with the bottom crust. Place the top crust on top of your filling. Trip the crust and crimp together to seal. I like to use a bit of left over dough and my apple shaped cookie cutter to make a nice decorate center for my pie but this is totally optional. I recommend cutting slits in the top of your pie. I went ahead and did mine in an eight slit pattern. Because of the flakiness of this crust, these slits will help when cutting the pie into eighths once it is finished baking.

Let’s talk briefly about the filling for this pie. I love the Apple Master apple peeler, corer, slicer.

apple-collage

It makes quick work of peeling, coring and slicing the apple all with a few quick turns of the handle. I’m not a huge fan of Granny Smith apples so I decided to use a combination of Granny Smith and Fuji. I loved the softer texture of the Fuji but you can use whichever type of apple that you like.

 

Here is the order in which I prepared my pies.

A. Cut butter into chunks and place in freezer

B. Prepare apple filling

C. Grate butter

D. Prepare crust and roll out immediately

 

I was able to make a 100% freshly milled whole wheat apple pie and it turned out great! I’ll be honest, it took about four tries before I got it right. I’ll share the recipe below but just remember….keep the butter and vodka (or ice water) cold right up until you use them and then once the dough is formed, roll it out right away. Also, wait to preheat the oven until after you have prepared the pie. A warm/hot kitchen will warm up the crust dough faster than you will want. Another tip, freshly milled flour can be a bit warm right after you mill it. Grind your grain and place the flour in the freezer along with the chunks of butter to allow the flour to cool down. This will help when rolling out the dough.

Okay, I think that is it. Here are both recipes. I topped mine with a simple vanilla whipped cream and a dash of cinnamon. Happy baking!

 

White Flour Pie Crust
White Flour Pie Crust

 

Apple Pie

Prep time: 20 minutes + 30 min freezer time

Bake time: 45 minutes

Yield: 1 – 9″ pie, about 8 servings

 

Crust:

1 3/4 cup all purpose flour, sifted

1 tsp. salt

12 Tbsp. butter, frozen in 2 Tbsp. chunks – grated

10 Tbsp. ice cold vodka (or ice water)

 

Filling:

6 medium/large apples

1/2 cup brown sugar (or sucanat)

2 Tbsp. all purpose flour

1 tsp. cinnamon

dash nutmeg

 

Cut butter into 2 Tbsp. chunks and place in freezer for 30 minutes. While butter freezes, prepare apple filling. Peel, core and slice apples. Cut slices in half and combine in a large bowl along with the flour, brown sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Set aside while you prepare the crust.

Once butter is frozen, attach the Vegetable Cutter attachment to the Ankarsrum mixer base, fitted with the medium grating drum. With the mixer speed set to about 3 o’clock, run the butter through the grater and place back in the freezer.

Remove the grater attachment and fix the double whisk bowl in place with the single wire whips. Place flour and salt into the mixing bowl and turn on speed low to fully combine. On low, add the frozen butter pieces and mix until butter is fully coated with flour. Measure out the vodka and pour over the butter/flour mixture with the mixer running still on low speed. Mix just until pecan size pieces of dough form. DO NOT over mix. Dough should come together within 2 minutes. If it stays in very small pea size pieces, add 1-2 Tbsp. ice water to help bring it all together.

On a floured mat, remove dough from bowl and press into a round with your hands. Cut off about 1/3 of the dough, form into a ball and set aside. This will be your top crust. Gently form remaining dough into a round, dust with flour and begin rolling out. With each pass of the rolling pin, turn crust a quarter turn. Dust with more flour as needed. Be sure to flour your rolling pin as well. Roll dough until it is large enough to cover the bottom and sides of your pie dish.

Once rolled out, fold in half from left to right and then again from top to bottom forming a folded wedge of pie dough. Transfer folded crust into your pie dish and gently unfold, pressing the dough down the sides and into the bottom of the dish.

Fill with apple filling and repeat rolling directions for the top crust. Once the top is on your pie, trim the edge, tuck and seal the top crust to the bottom all the way around the pie. Cut air vents in the top.

Preheat oven to 450°. Bake 35 minutes. Check the crust and add a crust shield or place aluminum foil around the edge to protect the crust from burning around the outside. Bake an additional 10 minutes or until golden brown on top.

Serve warm with fresh vanilla whipped cream and a dash of cinnamon.

Apple Pie
9″ Emile Henry Pie Dish
Apple Pie
Dinner Plate by: The Pioneer Woman

 

Apple Pie
Whole Wheat Apple Pie

 

Whole Wheat Apple Pie

Prep time: 20 minutes + 30 min freezer time

Bake time: 45 minutes

Yield: 1 – 9″ pie, about 8 servings

 

Crust:

2 1/2 cup freshly milled Soft Wheat flour

1 tsp. salt

12 Tbsp. butter, frozen in 2 Tbsp. chunks – grated

8 Tbsp. ice cold vodka (or ice water)

2 Tbsp. ice water – If needed

 

Filling:

6 medium/large apples

1/2 cup brown sugar (or sucanat)

2 Tbsp. all purpose flour

1 tsp. cinnamon

dash nutmeg

 

Cut butter into 2 Tbsp. chunks and place in freezer for 30 minutes. While butter freezes, prepare apple filling. Peel, core and slice apples. Cut slices in half and combine in a large bowl along with the flour, brown sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Set aside while you prepare the crust.

Once butter is frozen, attach the Vegetable Cutter attachment to the Ankarsrum mixer base, fitted with the medium grating drum. With the mixer speed set to about 3 o’clock, run the butter through the grater and place back in the freezer.

Remove the grater attachment and fix the double whisk bowl in place with the single wire whips. Place flour and salt into the mixing bowl and turn on speed low to fully combine. On low, add the frozen butter pieces and mix until butter is fully coated with flour. Measure out the vodka and pour over the butter/flour mixture with the mixer running still on low speed. Mix just until pecan size pieces of dough form. DO NOT over mix. Dough should come together within 2 minutes. If it stays in very small pea size pieces, add 1-2 Tbsp. ice water to help bring it all together.

On a floured mat, remove dough from bowl and press into a round with your hands. Cut off about 1/3 of the dough, form into a ball and set aside. This will be your top crust. Gently form remaining dough into a round, dust with flour and begin rolling out. With each pass of the rolling pin, turn crust a quarter turn. Dust with more flour as needed. Be sure to flour your rolling pin as well. Roll dough until it is large enough to cover the bottom and sides of your pie dish.

Once rolled out, fold in half from left to right and then again from top to bottom forming a folded wedge of pie dough. Transfer folded crust into your pie dish and gently unfold, pressing the dough down the sides and into the bottom of the dish.

Fill with apple filling and repeat rolling directions for the top crust. Once the top is on your pie, trim the edge, tuck and seal the top crust to the bottom all the way around the pie. Cut air vents in the top.

Preheat oven to 450°. Bake 35 minutes. Check the crust and add a crust shield or place aluminum foil around the edge to protect the crust from burning around the outside. Bake an additional 10 minutes or until golden brown on top.

Serve warm with fresh vanilla whipped cream and a dash of cinnamon.

 

Apple Pie

Apple Pie

Apple Pie

Apple Pie

Ankarsrum Featured Color: Red

Pie Dish by: Emile Henry – Size: 9″

Serving Plate by: The Pioneer Woman

Published by

Ashley McCord

Ashley has personally used the Ankarsrum for over 20 years, receiving her very own as a wedding gift in 1999. Continuing in the foot steps of her mother and grandmother, she enjoys cooking and baking for her busy family. She has a passion for whole grains, clean eating, and enjoys making everything from scratch. In 2012, Ashley became the Product Manager for the Ankarsrum Original Assistent here in the USA.